SKILLS DEVELOPMENT > THE ROLE OF THE SETA'S
 
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The role of SETAs
There are twenty-one (21) SETAs each classified according to economic sectors.
The functions and responsibilities of SETAs are set out in Chapter 3, section 10 of the Skills Development Act, 1998.
The Skills Development Act states that the functions and duties of a SETA are to:
  • Develop a sector skills plan. This is a plan to describe the trends in each sector, the skills that are in demand and to identify priorities for skills development
  • Implement the sector skills plan.
  • Develop and administer Learnerships. Learnerships include the traditional apprenticeships of the past. Like apprenticeships, Learnerships combine practice and theory. The main difference is that Learnerships go beyond "blue-collar" trades - they also prepare people for jobs in the new services sector, and for higher para-professional occupations. Learnerships are a new way of training.
  • Support the implementation of the National Qualifications Framework. The National Qualifications Framework (NQF) is the framework, based on eight levels, on which any qualification or learning outcome can be registered.
  • Undertake Quality Assurance. In promoting quality provision, SETAs will:
    • Accredit education and training providers.
    • Monitor provision to ensure that programmes are being followed.
    • Register Assessors.
    • Collaborate with other Education and Training Quality assurers.
    • Report to the South African Qualifications Authority on how they fulfil the ETQa role.
  • Disburse levies collected from employers in their sector. Employers pays 1% of their salary payroll to SARS on a monthly basis. The SETA uses 10% of the money to cover administration costs. 70% can be claimed back by companies. The remaining 20% goes to the National Skills Fund.
  • Report to the Minister and to the South African Qualifications Authority. SETAs are statutory bodies. This means that they are established by Act of Parliament and they are given clear responsibilities to be discharged in the public interest. The levy collected from employers is public money. The Director-General of the Department of Labour is the Accounting Officer. SETAs must therefore report to the Director-General on the efficient and effective use of funds. They are also governed by the Public Finance Management Act, the provisions of which are designed to ensure that public bodies operate in a manner that is not wasteful or irresponsible. In order that SETAs are publicly accountable, and to give them full responsibilities and scope to organize their work, each SETA is required to enter into a Service Level Agreement with the Department of Labour.
Developing the Sector Skills Plan
Each SETA must draw up a Sector Skills Plan (SSP).. SSPs are important in making decisions about the priorities for skills development. The SSP is important for the SETA since it provides the framework and the background for its actions.

To see the list of all Seta's Click here